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Eating Sushi for the First Time With Artists at Food
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The artist Gordon Matta-Clark is best known for his site specific cutouts of industrial buildings, in which he would frame city views by breaking into disused buildings and cutting holes into the walls. But he also loved to cook. In 1971, he and his then-girlfriend, opened a restaurant called...

downloadDescription:

The artist Gordon Matta-Clark is best known for his site specific cutouts of industrial buildings, in which he would frame city views by breaking into disused buildings and cutting holes into the walls. But he also loved to cook. In 1971, he and his then-girlfriend, opened a restaurant called Food, a place which artnet has named "Soho's first real restaurant." The restaurant stayed open for three years, serving good food at a cheap price for the art-minded residents of Soho. The restaurant was ahead of its time; for example, it would be decades before sushi, a specialty served by a Japanese assistant of Robert Rauscheberg’s, became a staple of the food scene in Soho again. With a rotating team of about 60 volunteer artists as chefs, conceptual dishes created for their interesting appearances, like “whole sea-bass frozen in aspic,” ruled the menu. Glasses of milk were sold for five cents, artificially cheap, for nostalgic purposes. The New York Times reports that “the atmosphere was one of a continual dinner party,” where politics and art were discussed. One famous meal was Matta-Clark's own "bone dinner," which served novelty foods like “bone-marrow,” which, while now common-place, would have been foreign to the sterile cooking of the early seventies. Diners took home necklaces and trinkets crafted from the animal skeletons as party favors. The restaurant was funded almost entirely by the inheritance of Caroline Gooden. She ran the restaurant like the home kitchen she was used to, buying the freshest ingredients in normal quantities, and not selling them above the finances of her artist-friends, which might explain why the business was forced to close in 1974.

127 Prince Street, New York
Art, Food, Gordon Matta-Clark, Sushi